July’s 30% increase in COVID-19 cases in Livingston County driven by younger age groups

While the number of confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases reported in Livingston County rose in July, the most dramatic increase in transmission was in the under-20 age group, which saw an increase of nearly 90%.

According to numbers reported by the Livingston County Health Department, on July 1, 2020, there were 607 confirmed and probable cases reported across all age groups; on July 31, there were 789, an increase of 30%. But in the under-20-age group — most likely among older adolescents — the number spiked from 38 on July 1 to 72 on July 31, an increase of a whopping 89.5%; and among those in the 20-29 age range, the number of cases in July jumped nearly 60%, from 78 cases at the beginning of the month, to 122 at the end.

Some point to the increases as the logical result of more testing — there have been over 31,000 tests administered to Livingston County residents, according to Michigan.gov/coronavirus — but that doesn’t tell the whole story.

Dr. Juan Luis Marquez

“While increased testing may explain some of the increases in cases, our rate of positivity has also slightly risen,” said Dr. Juan Luis Marquez, the shared medical director of the health departments in Livingston and Washtenaw counties. “Taken together, this shows that the increases in case count does reflect increased transmission in (Livingston) county. We are seeing this increase driven by younger age groups.”

Among the reasons for the increase in July, according to Marquez, are increased social gatherings; mild symptoms, which lead to more exposures prior to diagnosis; and people not practicing social distancing and mask wearing.

“This trend mirrors that of Michigan as a whole and other parts of the country that are seeing a rise in cases,” Marquez said. “We continue to ask for the community to stay home when possible, wear masks, wash their hands, and practice social distancing.”

As of July 31, 2020, there have been 91 Livingston County residents hospitalized with COVID-19, and 557 residents who are listed as recovered. The number of deaths — 28 — remained unchanged in July.

The number of cases per 1,000 at 3.3 in Livingston puts it in the middle area of Michigan’s counties, according to Michigan.gov/coronavirus.

Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that across the U.S. as of July 31, 2020, there have been a total of 4,473,974 COVID-19 cases, and 151,499 deaths. In Michigan, there have been 90,752 cases, with 6,453 deaths.



COVID-19 cases by ZIP

The number of COVID-19 cases rose across Livingston’s more-populous ZIP codes, but no increase was as dramatic as in ZIP code 48114, located in the eastern part of the county and including the Charter Township of Brighton. While the number of cases at 68 on July 1 in that ZIP code doesn’t feel all that high, when you do the math, it rocketed almost 260% from 19 in July.

Here’s a look at the number of cases in Livingston County’s various ZIP codes as of July 31, 2020:

TOTAL CASES BY ZIP CODE (in descending order based on number of cases)

• 48843 (+15.4%
 in July)
— 232 total cases reported out of 47,382 residents
 (201 on July 1)
— Rate: 4.9 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 193
— Probable cases: 43

• 48116 (+43.2%
 in July)
— 126 total cases reported out of 28,121 residents
 (88 on July 1)
— Rate: 4.48 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 92
— Probable cases: 37

• 48430 (+54.5%

 in July)
— 85 total cases reported out of 14,951 residents (55 on July 1)
— Rate: 5.69 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 75
— Probable cases: 14

• 48114 (+257.9%
 in July)

— 68 total cases reported out of 20,669 residents (19 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.29 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 48
— Probable cases: 20

• 48169 (+24.5%

 in July)
— 66 total cases reported out of 20,836 residents (53 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.17 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 51
— Probable cases: 16

• 48855 (+21.4%

 in July)
— 51 total cases reported out of 16,008 residents (42 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.19 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 41
— Probable cases: 10

• 48178 (+38.2%
 in July)

— 47 total cases reported out of 10,226 residents (34 on July 1)
— Rate: 4.6 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 36
— Probable cases: 11

• 48836 (+17.4%
 in July)

— 27 total cases reported out of 14,387 residents (23 on July 1)
— Rate: 1.88 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 22
— Probable cases: 7

• 48353 (+10%

 in July)
— 22 total cases reported out of 6,786 residents (20 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.24 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 18
— Probable cases: 5

• 48189 (+35.3%

 in July)
— 23 total cases reported out of 6,564 residents (17 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.5 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 20
— Probable cases: 5

• 48137 (+20%
 in July)
— 12 total cases reported out of 3,564 residents (10 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.37 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 11
— Probable cases: 2

• 48380 (+40%

 in July)
— 7 total cases reported out of 1,904 residents (5 on July 1)
— Rate: 3.68 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 6
— Probable cases: 1

• 48418
 — (No change
 in July)
— 2 total cases reported out of 571 residents
— Rate: 3.50 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 2
— Probable cases: 0

• 48451
 — (No change
 in July)
— 2 total cases reported out of 733 residents
— Rate: 2.73 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 2
— Probable cases: 0

• 48442
 — (No change
 in July)
— 1 total case reported out of 198 residents
— Rate: 5.05 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 1
— Probable cases: 0

• 48892
 — (No change
 in July)
— 1 total case reported out of 866 residents
— Rate: 1.15 cases per 1,000 residents
— Confirmed cases: 1
— Probable cases: 0

 

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About Maria Stuart 258 Articles
Journalist Maria Stuart lives in Howell. She worked at The Livingston County Press/Livingston County Daily Press & Argus as a reporter, editor and managing editor from 1990-2009. These days, she runs The Livingston Post, and is often spotted holding court at Uptown Coffeehouse.

1 Comment

  1. Isn’t it actually a good thing if more people are getting the virus, yet having less symptoms, possibly changing the dynamic of the spread? Would those people need a vaccine if they already had it? Could people who have had it start to go back to a normal life?

What do you think?