What I’ve Read Lately: Enchantment

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Enchantment-jtpedersen“Enchantment”
by: Guy Kawasaki
ISBN: 978-1-59184-379-5

Every once in a while, there comes a book you’re sorry to see come to an end. It’s not to say other books you’ve read were not tremendously enjoyable…just that they often come to an end about the time you’re ready for them to.  With Enchantment, I really would have enjoyed a few more pages.

The title for the book is well-picked, even if ‘real men’ may feel squeamish about a book with such a title.  Yet, it is something every budding entrepreneur should read.  It’s not a how-to in the conventional manner.  Guy’s not espousing business plans for their own sake like so many.

Instead he is giving you the very basis for engendering enchantment—whether your interest is in more successful product launches, building buzz or intrigue, or understanding how your business (or you) can be enchanting.

Enchantment is experiential…something you live, something you feel.  Guy, in his own open and disarming manner, helps the reader understand each of the components underlying a sense of enchantment, for you as an individual—personally and professionally; as a company; or, as a product being born.

How do you work toward being enchanting?  Enchantment provides numerous real-world, practical examples.  Consider just one: a product launch.

How many company’s follow the ‘tried and true’ staid approach of launching a product with a press release, a road show, and stock sales presentations.  Quite often they’re lifeless, they bring nothing to the party…if there’d been any intrigue, any ‘buzz’ before the product’s launch (ala Apple-anything), they fail to maintain it.

Instead, work to maintain or develop intrigue, “…captivate people’s interest and imagination by telling a compelling story. Demonstrate why folks should have faith in you. Let them know who ‘you’ are as you work toward building a relationship with them.

When Is Enchantment Necessary?

There are many tried-and-true methods to make a buck…  Enchantment is on a different curve: When you enchant people, your goal is not to make money from them or to get them to do what you want, but to fill them with great delight.  Here are situations when you need enchantment the most:

  • Aspiring to lofty, idealistic results
  • Making difficult, infrequent decisions
  • Overcoming entrenched habits
  • Defying a crowd
  • Proceeding despite delayed or nonexistent feedback

In so many ways, Enchantment walks us through, ‘things we’ve learned, but forgotten,’ in a manner that’s not condescending. A manner that gives you plenty of reason to reflect. More than once, you will likely find you’ve stopped reading, because you’ve been staring into space thinking about what Guy had to say. Books that put you in the ‘turtle’ mode of thinking, rather than the frenetic ‘hare’ brained mode are few and far between.

(In the interest of disclosure, a pre-release copy was provided for my review by the publisher.  No monetary or other consideration exists.)

I enjoyed the book.  I think you will too.  Available March 8, 2011, somewhere near you (I’m sure).

ps: You’ll even enjoy the Epilogue (colophon), too.