Transferring photo to glass

Share this:

I’ve been experimenting with photo transfers recently and altered windows and wanted to combine the two. I thought it would look really cool to add a ghostly photo transfer to a pane on one of the altered windows I had  been working on.

This altered window frame uses a lot of different techniques and products that I like but my biggest thrill is the photo transfer that I finally got to work! It took three tries but the third one turned out just as I had envisioned.

I started by printing a sepia-tone, color photo of my grandparents and my mother onto plain white office supply paper on my ink jet printer. I was determined to get it to work using my regular every-day supplies. I had read many articles on photo transfers and figured out that basically it’s an experiment for the most part and if you get lucky, it works. I got lucky.

My first attempt I did just by-the-book. I brushed Glastique Gloss Finishing Glaze (a product from Globecraft, a Midland, Michigan craft company) onto a portion of  the window pane in a large enough area to fit the photo I had printed out and torn the edges off. I placed the photo face-down in to the Glastique and burnished it onto the glass and wiped up any extra Glastique before it dried. I left it overnight and spritzed it the next day to rub the paper away and it all came off. Not supposed to happen.

Globecraft_piccolo_altered_window_linda_neff_tutorial_photo_5

So I cleaned the pane, printed another photo and tried again. This time I also brushed the Glastique onto the photo as well as the glass. Placed it on the glass, burnished it and to really hold it down, I brushed Glastique over the top. Wrong. The next day when I spritzed the paper to prep it for rubbing away, the water wouldn’t soak into it. The extra coating of Glastique sealed the photo onto the glass – Duh! So, I saturate the photo, scrap it up so I can get some water under it and finally get it all scrapped off.

Onto the third try.

I referred back to my book again and decided maybe I wasn’t using enough medium (Glastique) for the transfer to work. This time I printed another photo, tore the edges away, brushed a good thick layer of Glastique onto the glass and the face of the photo. I carefully laid it onto the coated area of the glass and used a brayer this time to burnish. I rolled over it in both directions several times, being very careful not to get Glastique on the back of the photo. When I thought it was good, I took a damp cloth and wiped away the Glastique that oozed out from using the brayer. It sat overnight once again.

Globecraft_piccolo_altered_window_linda_neff_tutorial_photo_4

The next day, I spritzed it with water and gently began to rub away the paper backing. Success! It worked just like it was supposed to. I think with photo transfers it’s just a matter of experimenting on different surfaces with different mediums. The G&P Glastique worked perfectly once I figured out how much I needed.

I also used three Globecraft DIY Ornaments to create a banner to string across the window. The ornaments are connected with jump rings and Piccolo Accents that are embossed with Globecraft Vintage Copper Embossing Powder. I also used Vintage Copper Embossing Powder on the ornament rings and the key. I used the heat flash technique so the powder is not melted completely leaving an aged, worn look.

Globecraft_piccolo_altered_window_linda_neff_tutorial_photo_2

The completed window looks even better than I imagined it would and the photo transfer is wonderful on the window pane. I backed it with a sheet of vintage music paper to add a bit of contrast. Those are old insulator knobs a friend spotted at an antique mall for me attached to the bottom. They make a great hanger or shelf to perch an old book or other memorabilia on.

Globecraft_piccolo_altered_window_linda_neff_tutorial_photo_1

I’m lovin’ playing with these DIY Ornaments. I’m always thinking of different uses for them. How about you – any ideas?