Make edible baskets for your Easter eggs

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Aren’t these adorable?  They are the perfect little thing to put on your Easter table. And they are completely edible.  Kids and adults alike will love them.  I wanted to post this far enough in advance that you would have time to go out and get the proper ingredients to make them, if you wanted to.

These little birds nests are made from shredded phyllo dough, called Kataifi.  My regular grocery stores do not carry this item, but my little specialty Italian deli did – in the frozen food section.  I hope that all of you who would like to make them can find this item because they are so fun to make.

How hard are they to make?  They’re just a snap.  Thaw out the phyllo dough, cut it in sections, toss with sugar and cinnamon (optional) and then form them into these little nests in a buttered muffin tin.  Bake for about 15 minutes. So easy.

I filled mine with Cadbury mini chocolate eggs.  You can fill them with jellybeans or any other Easter candy.  The nests are totally edible.

Edible Easter Egg Nests

for a printable recipe click here

from Martha Stewart 

Kataifi is the name for shredded phyllo dough.  If your grocery store doesn’t have it, specialty delis usually do (I found fine in my local Italian deli)

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more for tin
8 ounces (1/2 package kataifi, thawed
4 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)
chocolate eggs or jelly beans for serving in the nests

thawing the shredded phyllo


Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Brush a 12-cup muffin tin with butter. Pull phyllo into 1-inch bundles; cut bundles into 2-inch lengths. Place in a bowl; separate into a loose pile with fingers. Toss with butter, sugar and cinnamon, if using.

Divide among 12 muffin cups; press into bottom and up sides. Cook until golden and crisp around the edges, 15 minutes or so. Let cool; fill with candies.

Buona Pasqua!

All photos by The Italian Dish

 

 

About The Italian Dish 29 Articles

My name is Elaine and I live in neighboring Okemos. My mother, Angela, was from Italy and I guess I just have that Italian gene in me — I love to feed people. I began this blog to teach people how to cook. It pains me that so many people do not cook for themselves and instead order carryout five nights a week. Cooking from scratch is much easier than most people think. It’s healthier and cheaper. Cook along with me — I’ll show you how. I love photography and, in a previous life, was a painter. My food photography enables me to really show you how to create things, step by step. I love the beauty of food and the creativity of the kitchen. Developing my own recipes is just another way to fill a canvas. I hope you enjoy what I love so much — cooking for people and the joy of the table.