Foto Europa at the DIA

Mrs. Herbert Duckworth, Julia Margaret Cameron, c. 1867, albumen print. Detroit Institute of Arts
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European Photography, 1840 to Present

Mrs. Herbert Duckworth, Julia Margaret Cameron, c. 1867, albumen print. Detroit Institute of Arts
Mrs. Herbert Duckworth, Julia Margaret Cameron, c. 1867, albumen print. Detroit Institute of Arts

The Detroit Institute of Arts presents European photography from its inception in 1839 to the present in the exhibition Foto Europa, 1840 to Present. More than 70 works by European photographers drawn mostly from the DIA collection will be on view through April 27, 2014. The exhibition is free with museum admission.

Elizabeth Rigby (later Lady Eastlake)
Elizabeth Rigby (later Lady Eastlake), Robert Adamson, David Octavius Hill, 1843/1847, calotype. Detroit Institute of Arts

Europe has long been the site for groundbreaking innovation and experimentation in photography by influential artists and photographers. Foto Europa highlights the contributions of Europeans to the history and tradition of fine art photography as well as artists who have used the medium as a vehicle for contemporary art since 1960. Included are rare examples of early techniques, classic black-and-white photography and large-scale contemporary color photographs, many of which have never been on view.

Omar Pacha and Col. Simmons Attached to the Turkish Head Quarters
Omar Pacha and Col. Simmons Attached to the Turkish Head Quarters, Roger Fenton, c. 1855, albumen print. Detroit Institute of Arts

Highlights include

  • 19th-century French daguerreotypes
  • Early paper prints by British pioneers
  • Selfies by women artists Ilse Bing, Claude Cahun and Hannah Höch
  • Experimental work and abstraction from between the World Wars
  • Early to mid-19th-century innovative reportage photographs
  • Recent work by European photographers in Detroit
  • L’album photographique de Christian Boltanski, a fictional take on a traditional photo album of so-called childhood pictures.
  • German painter Gerhard Richter’s 1969 mysterious multi-panel series entitled 9 Objekte (9 Objects).

The museum is open from 9 a.m.– 4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17.